7 ways to avoid damage to your Alloy Wheels

Written by wefixalloys. Posted in Advice from We Fix Alloys

So you’ve had your alloy wheels refurbished by We Fix Alloys – how are you going to keep them looking so good?

7 ways to avoid damage to your (newly repaired) Alloy Wheels

  1. NEVER, EVER, EVER drive up a kerb!
  2. Keep your Alloy Wheels clean. The more often you clean your alloy wheels the easier it is. If you let brake dust (which is corrosive) and grime build up it will soon etch its way into the surface making it much more difficult to remove.
  3. Watch out for debris on the road. Don’t run over anything, even if it looks like it won’t do any damage – it probably will. (We’ve heard of someone who ran over something that looked like a cardboard box that fell off a truck in front of him. It was actually a metal casting – two of his alloy wheels were smashed beyond repair when he ran over it!)
  4. Use proprietary wheel cleaners sparingly. They are great at shifting some of the worst grime but they can contain acids which will damage the lacquer finish if you don’t rinse off properly.
  5. Avoid clipping kerb when parallel parking. If you have a passenger with you ask them to guide you in. It may take an extra few seconds but could save you hundreds!
  6. Keep your tyres properly inflated. Low pressure in your tyres increases the chances of damage to your wheel rims
  7. Avoid making tight turns around corners. The most common source of damage is caused by rolling a wheel over a sharp corner.

 

We hope these 7 tips to avoid damage to your alloy wheels work for you – but remember if you run into problems with your alloy wheels then We Fix Alloys is the place to come for top quality alloy wheel repair and refurbishment across Newcastle and the North East

We Fix Alloys - alloy wheel repair Newcastle

Alloy Wheel Refurbishment Cost

Written by wefixalloys. Posted in Advice from We Fix Alloys

Alloy Wheel Refurbishment Cost

A question we are often asked by our customers is ‘How much will my alloy wheel refurbishment cost?’

Well, the short answer is ‘It depends’ and for the slightly longer answer with some free, expert advice on alloy wheel refurbishment cost just keep reading.

The first decision your alloy wheel refurbishment expert from We Fix Alloys will make with you is whether you need a mobile alloy wheel repair or a more extensive alloy wheel refurbishment in our fully provisioned workshop. We recommend all our customers send us a photo by text to 07890 691838 or by email to hello@wefixalloys.co.uk or drop by our workshop  so that we can give accurate quotations on their alloy wheel refurbishment cost. This means we can ensure that we offer the right service, first time, every time.

We Fix Alloys mobile alloy wheel repair cost

You can schedule a visit at a time and place of your choosing, either at home, work or play. All we need to work on your damaged alloy wheels is a little water and access to two 13amp sockets. We take around an hour to transform each damaged alloy into what will look like new alloy wheels. Our mobile alloy wheel repair vans are specially equipped to repair scratched alloys, kerbed alloys and alloys just showing their age!

Mobile alloy wheel repair is only suitable for minor scratches as only the top surface of the wheel is repaired. This is why the best alloy wheel experts have workshop facilities to take care of more extensive damage. Here are some photos of damage that can be repaired using our mobile alloy wheel facilities:

 

We Fix Alloys before mobile alloy wheel repair

Audi A4 Alloy Wheel before Mobile Alloy Wheel Repair

We Fix Alloys after mobile alloy wheel repair

Audi A4 Alloy Wheel after Mobile Alloy Wheel Repair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We Fix Alloys before mobile alloy wheel repair

Vauxhall Insignia Alloy Wheel before Mobile Alloy Wheel Repair

We Fix Alloys after mobile alloy wheel repair

Vauxhall Insignia Alloy Wheel after Mobile Alloy Wheel Repair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One decision we like our customers to consider when booking a mobile alloy wheel repair is how the repaired alloy will wheel look compared to the other wheels – it’ll look like a new one! We would encourage you to get 2 wheels done as then the difference between the sides of the car will not be so noticeable. For this reason we often have special offers on with reduced costs for more than one alloy wheel repair. Make sure you sign up to our newsletter to be included in future special offers.

 

We Fix Alloys workshop alloy wheel refurbishment cost

 

We can also repair alloy wheels that are badly damaged, have corrosion or oxidisation, or are buckled and bent and are too damaged to repaired at home. Good as our mobile alloy wheel repair vans and technicians are there are limitations to what can be achieved at the roadside.

Luckily, our support workshop is fully equipped to take on even the most badly damaged alloy wheels so no need to worry – we can fix those alloy wheels for you even if they look as bad as this:

 

Alloy Alloy wheel before workshop repairAlloy wheel before workshop repairAlloy wheel before workshop repair

 

The first job is to take the wheels off your car and then the tyres off the wheels. Then the wheels go into our bespoke designed environmentally friendly acid stripping system. Then we use a specially designed blasting cabinet to make sure the wheels are completely cleaned of their old paint. Next they are sanded and filled to make sure the surface is as smooth as possible before they are powder coated and returned to their showroom condition.

Of course, when you have your alloy wheels fully refurbished then you can change the colour. This is where you have the opportunity to fully customise the work we do for you. We literally have 100’s of photos in our gallery – why not take a look today?

As for the cost, well we have a detailed price structure on our website, various special offers run through the year, you can speak to us at events and don’t forget to sign up for our special offers. We like to support motorsport and classic car clubs so don’t forget that your membership might give you a discount (and if you run a club please get in touch to arrange). Thanks for taking the time to read this and we look forward to meeting you soon

 

 

We Fix Alloys - alloy wheel repair Newcastle

 

 

Winter Driving Tips from RoSPA

Written by wefixalloys. Posted in Advice from We Fix Alloys

 

We’d like to thank RoSPA for this great advice and driving tips for difficult conditions from their website

Driving in the winter is very different than in other times of the year. Adverse weather and longer periods of darkness (especially after the clocks go back at the end of October) makes driving more hazardous. Prolonged periods of heavy snow and floods  means that we need to adapt the way we drive.

The following tips may help you cope better with the various seasonal weather hazards. However, as we all know, many of these conditions can occur at any time of year.

1. Prepare your vehicle

It’s a good idea to have your vehicle fully serviced before winter starts and have the anti-freeze tested. If you can’t have it serviced, then do your own checks. In particular, check:

  • Lights are clean and working
  • Battery is fully charged
  • Windscreen, wiper blades and other windows are clean and the washer bottle filled with screen wash
  • Tyre condition, tread depth and pressure (of all the tyres, including the spare)
  • Brakes are working well
  • Fluids are kept topped up, especially windscreen wash (to the correct concentration to prevent it freezing), anti-freeze and oil

 

2. Emergency Kit

When extreme weather is possible, keep an emergency kit in your car, especially if you’re going on a long journey. If this seems unnecessary, take a moment to imagine yourself stranded in your car overnight, due to a snow storm or floods. How would you stay warm? What would you eat and drink? If you must drive in these conditions, RoSPA recommends that you carry:

  • Tow rope
  • A shovel
  • Wellington boots
  • A hazard warning triangle
  • De-icing equipment
  • First aid kit (in good order)
  • A working torch
  • A car blanket
  • Warm clothes
  • Emergency Rations (inc hot drink in a flask – non-alcoholic, of course)
  • Mobile Phone (fully charged)

 

3. Prepare your journey

Listen to local/national weather broadcasts and travel bulletins – especially for the areas you will be driving through. As conditions can change rapidly, check them regularly and be prepared to change your plans if conditions on your route worsen.

If conditions are very bad, and the emergency services are recommending that people don’t travel, then avoid making your journey unless it is absolutely necessary. Can you postpone your trip? Can you travel by other means, or avoid the need for the journey completely by using the phone or email?

Of course, what’s ‘essential’ to one person may not be to another; we each have to make our own decisions according to our circumstances. But, try to be realistic about which journeys are essential and which ones could be postponed.

If you decide you really must travel:

  • Let someone know where you are going and what time you hope to arrive, so that they can raise the alarm if you get into difficulties.
  • Plan alternative routes in case your main choice(s) becomes impassable.
  • Keep your fuel tank near to full to ensure that you do not run out.
  • Make sure you have a fully charged mobile phone, so you can call for help or alert someone if you’re delayed – it could be a long walk to a phone, if you don’t have a mobile phone.
  • If you don’t have an emergency kit in your vehicle, at least take extra warm clothes, boots and a torch. Consider keeping a couple of long-life energy bars in the glove box.
  • Clear your windows and mirrors completely of snow and ice before you set off (make sure the heater is blowing warm air before setting off – it will keep your windscreen clear.)

 

4. Prepare yourself

Most of us have very little experience of driving in extreme conditions, such as snow, so take some time to consider how it affects your driving. Don’t just drive as normal.

When was the last time you had any driver assessment or training? This is an ideal time for some refresher training. If your employer provides driver training, take advantage of it. Or you can contact the RoSPA Advanced Drivers and Riders group in your area. To find out which is the nearest to you, go to www.roadar.org

A lot of us will catch colds or other illnesses during the winter. If you’re feeling so ill that your driving might be affected, don’t take the chance of driving.

 

5. Driving in snow or ice

If you find yourself driving in snow or on icy or snow covered roads, adapt your driving to these conditions:

  • Reduce your speed. The chances of skidding are much greater and your stopping distance will increase massively.
  • Only travel at a speed at which you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear. Speed limits are the maximum in ideal conditions; in difficult conditions, they can often be too fast.
  • Avoid harsh braking and acceleration, or sharp steering.
  • Always reduce your speed smoothly and in plenty of time on slippery surfaces.
  • Slow down in plenty of time before bends and corners.
  • Braking on an icy or snow covered bend is extremely dangerous. The centrifugal force will continue to pull you outwards and the wheels will not grip very well. This could cause your vehicle to spin.
  • To brake on ice and snow without locking your wheels, get into a low gear earlier than normal, allow your speed to fall and use your brakes gently.
  • Increase the gap between you and the vehicle in front. You may need up to TEN TIMES the normal distance for braking.
  • Keep your vehicle well-ventilated. The car heater turned up full can quickly make you drowsy.
  • In snow, stop frequently to clean the windows, wheel arches, lights and number plates.
  • Visibility will probably be reduced, so use dipped headlights.
  • During wintry weather, road surfaces are often wet and/or covered in frost and ice or snow. But this does not occur uniformly. A road will often have isolated patches of frost or ice after most of the road has thawed – this commonly occurs under bridges.

If you get stuck in snow:

  • If you get stuck in snow, revving your engine to try to power out of the rut will just make the rut worse. Instead, move your vehicle slowly backwards and forwards out of the rut using the highest gear you can.
  • If this doesn’t work, you may have to ask a friendly passerby for a push or get your shovel out.
  • If you get caught in a snow drift:
  • Don’t leave your vehicle
  • Call your breakdown service or the emergency services and let help come to you.
  • Don’t run the engine to keep warm

 

6. Rain

Rain reduces your ability to see and greatly increases the distance required to slow down and stop. Remember that you will need about TWICE your normal braking distance. Use windscreen wipers, washers and dipped headlights; drive smoothly and plan your moves in plenty of time

Aquaplaning is caused by driving too fast into surface water. When the tyre tread cannot channel away enough water, the tyre(s) lose contact with the road and your car will float on a wedge of water. Aquaplaning can be avoided by reducing speed in wet conditions. Having the correct tyre pressure and tyre tread depth will maximise your tyres’ ability to maintain their road grip. If it happens, ease off the accelerator and brakes until your speed drops sufficiently for the car tyres to make contact with the road again.

 

Flooded roads

  •  Avoid the deepest water – which is usually near the kerb.
  • Don’t attempt to cross if the water seems too deep.
  • If you are not sure of the water’s depth, look for an alternative route.
  • If you decide to risk it, drive slowly in first gear but keep the engine speed high by slipping the clutch – this will stop you from stalling.
  • Be aware of the bow wave from approaching vehicles – operate an informal ‘give way’ with approaching vehicles.
  • Remember to test your brakes when you are through the flood.

7. Fog

Avoid driving in fog unless your journey is absolutely necessary.

Fog is one of the most dangerous weather conditions. An accident involving one vehicle can quickly involve many others, especially if they are driving too close to one another.

If you must drive:

  • Follow weather forecasts and general advice to drivers in the local and national media
  • Allow plenty of extra time for your journey
  • Check your car before you set off. Make sure everything is in good working order, especially the lights
  • Reduce your speed and keep it down
  • Switch on headlights and fog lamps if visibility is reduced
  • If you can see the vehicles to your rear, the drivers behind can see you – switch off your rear fog lamps to avoid dazzling them
  • Use the demister and windscreen wipers
  • Do not ‘hang on’ to the rear lights of the car in front as you will be too close to be able to brake safely
  • Switch off distracting noises and open the window slightly so that you can listen for other traffic, especially at crossroads and junctions
  • Beware of speeding up immediately visibility improves slightly. In patchy fog you could find yourself ‘driving blind’ again only moments later
  • If you break down, inform the police and get the vehicle off the road as soon as possible. Never park on the road in fog and never leave it without warning lights of some kind if it is on the wrong side of the road

 

Thanks to RoSPA for this detailed advice.

Remember if you do damage your wheels driving then call We Fix Alloys – (expert alloy wheel repair Newcastle) and we’ll repair and refurbish them so they look like new and are safe to drive again

Alloy Wheel Repair and Refurbishment – MOT guidance

Written by wefixalloys. Posted in Advice from We Fix Alloys

Alloy Wheel Repair and Refurbishment – MOT guidance from  We Fix Alloys

The MOT inspection manual issued in January 2012 made inspection of your alloy wheels an important part of the MOT. Since we have had a number of customers bring their alloy wheels for repair following MOT failure and/or advisory notices we thought it would be good to share these points with you. If you are at all concerned about the safety of your alloy wheels then please take your car to an expert in alloy wheel repair – like We Fix Alloys

The MOT inspector will check all road wheels for cracks, damage and distortion (particularly to the rim) and for the presence and condition of spokes

Reasons why your alloy wheels might cause an MOT failure:

  • A wheel badly damaged, distorted or cracked, or with a badly distorted bead rim
  • A wheel which has a spoke(s) missing,
  • Cracked or excessively loose, bent, or corroded wheels.
  • Fixtures attaching your alloy wheel e.g. stud hole(s) visibly badly worn , a wheel stud, bolt or nut loose or missing, wheel insecure or  excessive elongation of a stud hole(s) in a wheel.

Although it might not cause an MOT failure your spare wheel will also be inspected and you’ll be told if a defect is noticed on your spare wheel.

Corrosion can cause your tyres to lose pressure – this is especially dangerous in the winter when incorrect pressures can interfere noticeably with your car’s handling.  Leaking alloy wheels caused by corrosion can easily and quickly be repaired – visit We Fix Alloys today to get alloy wheel repair, checks and refurbishment.

Alloy Wheel Refurbishment – What happens in the alloy wheel repair process?

Written by wefixalloys. Posted in Advice from We Fix Alloys

What happens in the Alloy Wheel repair process?

Alloy Wheel Repair by We Fix Alloys

Alloy Wheel Refurbishment is a way of saving money by having your wheels repaired instead of replaced. This article describes the process used by this professional wheel repair company.

Alloy wheels are expensive. You don’t want to replace them unless they are very badly damaged. If you want to get them repaired you don’t want to let just anyone have a go at repairing them. So make sure you use a specialist Alloy Wheel Refurbishment company. Avoid the cowboys – more on this here.

Repairing or refurbishing wheels involves removing them from the car (or motor bike, van or golf cart!). The wheels also need to be separated from the tyres so a proper repair can take place without missing any parts of the wheel that can’t be reached. Some companies claim to complete a full refurbishment when they are only spraying the front of the wheel and not removing corrosion first – avoid these companies! You will end up paying twice and nobody wants that!

The wheel is first stripped of the lacquer coating using a strong acid. Then, if the damage is bad, or if there is any corrosion of the alloy, the wheel is sandblasted. Any dents or deep scratches can be filled with a suitable filler. Even the most damaged of wheels can be fixed by the experienced welder we use. The wheel is then heated and powdercoated before a clear (or sometimes coloured) lacquer coat is applied. Finally the tyres are replaced and the wheels rebalanced before being fitted back on the vehicle.

There are some exceptions to this process. If the damage is slight and easily accessible it’s possible to carry out a quick cosmetic repair but be skeptical of any repair service that quotes you a ridiculously low price for a thorough job. All they’ll do is flash over the damage and in a few months time your wheels will look as shabby as ever and you’ll be back where you started!

So, it’s not a simple process but, using modern equipment, it can be carried out quickly and inexpensively (compared to the cost of a new set of wheels). We will need you to bring the wheels to our workshop and we can usually complete the repairs in a day.

So now you know all about the alloy wheel repair process why not get in touch and book your alloy wheel repair in today!

 

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We Fix Alloys
UNIT A1
MORSTON QUAYS
STEPHENSON STREET
WALLSEND
NE28 6UE
(Postcode for satnav is NE28 0PD)

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